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New multi-disciplinary research team to focus on air quality

Researchers at the University of Birmingham’s Institute for Global Innovation (IGI) have launched a new multi-disciplinary research team around clean air. 

The new research project will unite atmospheric scientists, clinicians, economic geographers, transport specialists and social scientists to develop holistic solutions to air pollution. 

The IGI focuses on multi-disciplinary research to address some of the world’s most pressing challenges and it will now focus on air pollution.

The team will focus on indoor and outdoor air quality, aiming to provide relevant insights to both the UK and low-middle income countries. 

IGI’s main themes now include clean air, resilient cities, water challenges in a changing world, gender inequality, and 21st-century transnational crime. 

Ambassador of Great Britain and Northern Ireland UNESCO Matthew Lodge said: ‘UNESCO believes in bringing together broad ranges of perspectives and expertise that advance our ability to solve pressing global challenges.

‘The University of Birmingham shares our commitment to solving global challenges and is making an important and meaningful contribution to international cultural and scientific co-operation.’

Professor Hisham Mehanna, director of the IGI and researchers from the institute of cancer and genomic sciences said: ‘There is a real buzz about interdisciplinary research and we are already seeing the fruits of our labour, particularly in areas such as water, cities and gender inequality.

‘It is those successes, and the impact that they have on the most vulnerable people around the world, that inspires all of us to do even more. With that in mind, we are broadening our horizons even further and it is wonderful to introduce a newly emerging theme – Clean Air – to our portfolio.’

In related news, the health impact of air pollution in Birmingham is costing the city £470m a year.

These are the findings of King’s College London researchers who combined relationships between Defra’s Air Quality modelling concentrations of PM2.5 and NOx and health outcomes for each parliamentary constituency in Birmingham.

Photo Credit –  Matthew Lodge

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