Alexa, how long does an EV battery charge last?

An app voiced by Ben Fogle has launched that can answer the most commonly-asked questions about electric vehicles (EVs).

Available through Amazon Alexa and Google Play devices, the ‘Electric Vehicles Voice App’ answers over 50 questions about EVs, such as how to charge them and how their environmental benefits. 

It’s been created by media agency Wavemaker and Go Ultra Low, the joint government and industry campaign to boost awareness of EVs.

Research by Wavemaker has found that 20,000 questions a month go unanswered or are answered incorrectly by Alexa and Google Assistant. As only 26% of people who consider an electric vehicle currently go on to purchase one, they say this ‘sparked the inspiration’ to create an app to change people’s mindsets, positioning them as desirable and redefining the technology as normal and every-day.

According to Wavemaker, since the app’s launch, it has answered a combined total of 1662 questions, with an average session time of 2 minutes and 52 seconds.

Future of Transport Minister Rachel Maclean said: ‘Electric vehicles are no longer an idea for the future, with more people than ever before opting for this new and exciting form of transport.

‘Whether you’re interested in costs or the environmental benefits, this new app supported through the government’s Go Ultra low campaign, will help to drive the uptake of electric vehicles.’

‘This will in turn cut transport emissions and make our communities healthier, better places to live… all from the comfort of our own sofas.’

Last month, Air Quality News spoke to Ben Fogle about EVs.

As part of his role as an ambassador for Go Ultra Low, his family has converted to an electric vehicle. He says it’s a small thing his family is doing to improve air quality, but it’s a frustration that he still receives criticism for it.

‘There’s a notion of accusing people or picking people up for their shortcomings, rather than celebrating the positive contributions they give, which is slightly disingenuous,’ he says.

‘But sometimes you have to make the least-worst decision. That’s sometimes where you have to go in life. Too many people are seeking perfection and perfection smothers progress. If we tried to only make the decisions that have a 100% positive change, then we’re not going to convince anyone.’

Read the interview here.

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