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Don’t use wood-burning stoves during coronavirus crisis, council urges

Residents in Brighton have been asked to ‘think twice’ about lighting wood-burning stoves and other fires during the coronavirus crisis, because the smoke makes respiratory conditions worse.

With the majority of people in the area now entering their third week of coronavirus lockdown, Brighton and Hove City Council has warned that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emitted by the stoves could put residents who are already at a higher risk from the worst symptoms of coronavirus in a more vulnerable position.

The popularity of stoves over recent years has rocketed and according to the industry body HETAS, the number of registrations increased 10-fold in the decade between 2004 and 2014, from 12,000 to 130,000 a year.

The government’s own statistics show that burning wood and coal in open fires and stoves account for more than a third (38%) of the UK’s primary emissions of PM2.5, compared to industry and road transport, which contribute 16% and 12%, respectively.

Although the spell of warm weather that is set to hit the UK this week could mean that fewer wood-burners are lit, other councils including, Bath and North Somerset, have already issued warnings to residents who might be tempted to burn garden waste outside due to cancelled waste collections.

Since the coronavirus lockdown began two weeks ago there have been large drops in transport-related nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollution in cities across the UK. However, some areas such as Bromley in London have seen increases in fine particulate matter (PM2.5), which councillors there believe is due to an increase in garden bonfires.

Brighton and Hove Cllr Anne Pissaridou, said: ‘At a time when millions of people are being forced to stay at home, more people than ever are using their gardens for fresh air and exercise.

‘And with the weather starting to improve people with and without gardens are opening their windows to get some welcome fresh air into their homes.

‘I just think that most of our residents would rather not have a bonfire going on near to them in the current situation, and would rather not have to breathe in unnecessary smoke if they don’t have to.

‘We also need to be mindful that coronavirus is a respiratory disease. A lot of people have concerns that the extra smoke generated by wood-burners, log fires and bonfires may be making things worse for people who already have health problems.

‘So during this time of national crisis we’re just saying please think of others and try to avoid making things worse for them.’

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Adhinda Ikaputri
Adhinda Ikaputri
1 year ago

Airlangga University (UNAIR) Economic Experts responded to the impact of the Corona virus spreading in China on the Indonesian economy. According to Dr. Wisnu Wibowo, S.E., M.Sc., the spread of the Corona virus has a significant impact on the Indonesian economy, both nationally and regionally. He explained that at least two sectors would be affected. First is the disruption of the production process due to the delay in imports of raw materials and auxiliary materials for the manufacturing industry. For the full article please visit the following link
http://news.unair.ac.id/2020/02/24/pakar-ekonom-unair-tanggapi-imbas-penyebaran-virus-corona-di-china-pada-perekonomian-indonesia/

Andy
Andy
1 year ago

What a joke most stove are defra approved and clean burn (burn 100%) of fuel so zero particlate emission. Tell Coooooonsil to stick this rule up there rectum. But garden bonfires should be banned

H Webb
H Webb
1 year ago
Reply to  Andy

We dont have any gas where we live two economy 7 heaters try living with those when it’s cold yes I have defra approved wood burner if cold I hope I dont get scolded by others being WARM

stephen hyde
stephen hyde
1 year ago
Reply to  Andy

Are you saying that no smoke comes out of your chimney? It’s the smoke that carries the particles. Domestic wood burning produces 3 times as much particle pollution as road traffic. Have a thought for others, over 3 million people in the UK are being treated for asthma. I know someone who is confined to his house every winter because of woodsmoke. He has an air purifier in the house just so that he can breathe properly, all because of other peoples smoke.

John
John
1 year ago
Reply to  Andy

The joke is your comment Andy. Zero particulate emissions, you are kidding right? Certainly kidding yourself with ridiculous statements like that.

dave
dave
11 months ago
Reply to  John

you are all jokers, volcanos which are natural events kick up million times more damage than we can do i a life time. bonfires asre a problem, not wood burning stoves not to mention what harm that ship with nitrate did to us!

STEPHEN HYDE
STEPHEN HYDE
1 year ago

DEFRA stoves are tested in laboratory conditions and in practice are little different from the old ones. Andy, can you smell the smoke? If you can, then you’re breathing particulate matter + dangerous toxins. The sweet smell from wood burning is BENZENE, used in weed killer and insecticides. Altogether they cause lung disease, especially in children, heart attacks, brain damage, dementia and serious eye and throat problems. Read ‘The Invisible Killer’ by Dr. Gary Fuller.

Brian Kermode
Brian Kermode
1 year ago

With these and other findings, I can not understand why wood burning stoves are not being banned altogether. I am an asthma and bronchitis sufferer, and some days I can not go out of the house, like many other people, and also we cant open our windows. Its very selfish of those with stoves, and they do not appreciate what discomfort they cause. In 1996 wood burning stoves were banned in Tasmania by the Aussie government, due to the vast number of people dying from chest and heart related problems. Why are we so far behind?? We used to be leaders in health matters.. Dr Gary Fuller is leading the charge, long may it continue, but I hope it doesn’t take too long!!!

stephen hyde
stephen hyde
1 year ago
Reply to  Brian Kermode

The Government seem reluctant to ban stoves but surely, with the technology we have, filters could be fitted to the chimney to filter out the potentially deadly particles. These would need to be cleaned regularly, which would be an opportunity for the owners to see the black, sticky mess inside and realise this is what their lungs must be like.

Andrew
Andrew
1 year ago

What about BBQ smoke ?

hai
hai
8 months ago

interesting article. thank you

Landon "Lumber Master" Edgington

Unless you live really close to your neighbors, I don’t see why you would need to ban these types of stoves. If you’re that concerned about the harmful chemicals that you might get, then get an air purifier.

Bathroom Remodel Denver

Absolutely! Residents in Brighton have been asked to ‘think twice’ about lighting wood burning stoves and other fires during the coronavirus crisis,

Firewood Greeley Co
2 months ago

A lot of people have concerns that the extra smoke generated by wood-burners, log fires and bonfires may be making things worse for people who already have health problems

Directory Listing
2 months ago

 Absolutely! cooking is the leading cause of home cooking fires, meaning that home cooking fires occur most often when people aren’t keeping a close eye on what they’re cooking.

Airbnb Cleaning Service Denver

Absolutely! if you are recovering from COVID-19, you may be at increased risk of health effects from exposure to residential wood smoke this heating season due to compromised heart and/or lung function related to COVID-19. In addition, exposure to wood smoke may make you more susceptible to respiratory infections.

Tree Service Colorado Springs

Absolutely! It is important to remember that wood burning stoves emit high levels of particulate matter. which is one of the causes of increased pollution. Burning wet, seasoned, or dry wood releases large amounts of pollutants and has a knock-on impact on respiratory health.

Boulder Concrete Contractors Co

I agree! This is wood burning season for so many BC residents, unfortunately, once upon a time we were all very healthy proactive individuals, who have been subjected to residential wood smoke for far too long.

cedar shingles
24 days ago

I’m really glad to see you post an article on the coronavirus crisis. It’s great that you’re informing people about what they should and shouldn’t do during this time. Thank you for posting such an awesome article! I’m sure it will help many people.

Tree Services Loveland

Thanks for that! The law on domestic bonfires in England and Wales is very simple: there isn’t one; there is, however, a law against any subsequent nuisance that having one might cause

Locksmith Denver
18 days ago

Absolutely! Superior modern wood burning stoves at optimum temperature may have low emissions, but it takes time for that optimum temperature to be reached, a significantly smelly period, and the similar cool down period again, negate the optimum efficiency and cause most offence to the unlucky neighbours in dense communities. Having to keep windows closed and the soot on windows and facias etc, are clear indications of the undesirability of these burners in any community. It is the neighbour that gets the downside of a wood burner.