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Air pollution may be linked to heart failure

Exposure to air and noise pollution may increase the risk of heart failure, according to the American Heart Association. 

The researchers collected data from 22,000 individuals and measured their exposure to air and noise pollution by maintaining records of each individual’s residential addresses. 

The analysis of various pollutants and their effects on heart failure revealed that: 

  • For every 5.1 µg/m3 increase in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure over three years, the risk of incident heart failure increased by 17%
  • For every 8.6 µg/m3 increase in NO2 exposure over three years, the risk of incident heart failure increased by 10%
  • Increased exposure to PM2.5 and status as a former smoker was associated with a 72% increased risk of incident heart failure
  • For every 9.3 dB increase in road traffic noise exposure over three years, the risk of incident heart failure increased by 12%

selective focus photography of heart organ illustration

‘We were surprised by how two environmental factors – air pollution and road traffic noise – interacted,’ said Youn-Hee Lim, PhD, lead author of the study.

‘Air pollution was a stronger contributor to heart failure incidence compared to road traffic noise; however, the women exposed to both high levels of air pollution and road traffic noise showed the highest increase in heart failure risk.

‘In addition, about 12% of the total study participants had hypertension at enrollment of the study. However, 30% of the nurses with heart failure incidence had a previous history of hypertension, and they were the most susceptible population to air pollution exposure.

‘To minimize the impact of these exposures, broad public tactics such as emissions control measures should be implemented. Strategies like smoking cessation and blood pressure control must be encouraged to help reduce individual risk.’

In related news, even small increases in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) levels could be linked to a heightened risk of cardiovascular and respiratory deaths, according to a new study published by The BMJ.

Photo by jesse orrico

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Sherrie
Sherrie
23 hours ago

How can this be compared and related to Indoor Air Pollution? As the EPA has stated indoor air has surpassed outdoor air pollution. We can relegate this to the toxic consumer usage.