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Every medical centre in London exceeds WHO air quality standards

Every hospital, medical centre, and care home in London is in an area that exceeds World Health Organisation air pollution guidelines.

The data which was published by City Hall shows that for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) while 91% of hospitals and medical centres meet the legal limits set by the UK Government, no hospital of medical centre meets the stricter WHO guidelines. 

Similarly for particulate matter (PM2.5), every hospital and medical centre exceeds the WHO recommended guidelines. 

Today the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan will visit Evelina London Hospital to talk with doctors, nurses, and young patients about the impact of air pollution. 

The Mayor will also discuss the growing evidence of an association between air pollution and Covid-19.

Staff at Evelina London have been leading the way in Covid-19 research and were instrumental in the discovery and research of a rare inflammatory condition in children linked to Covid-19 called Paediatric Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome (PIMS-TS). To date, they have successfully treated over 300 patients.

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The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan said: ‘We know toxic air pollution stunts the growth of children’s lungs and worsens chronic illnesses such as asthma, lung and heart disease. That is why it is unacceptable that all of London’s hospitals, medical centres and care homes, which look after some of the most vulnerable Londoners when they are most unwell, are in areas which exceed the World Health Organization guideline limit for pollution.

‘Tackling air pollution in our city has been a priority for me since I was first elected in 2016 and I’m more determined than ever to do everything I can to consign air pollution to the history books.

‘We simply don’t have time to waste and I’m not willing to put off the action we can take a moment longer than necessary. Steps to tackle air pollution will also help tackle the climate crisis and I’m determined that we do everything possible to protect Londoners’ health both now and in the generations to come.’

Claire Lemer, clinical director at Evelina London, added: ‘Evelina London cares for more than 100,000 children and young people with a range of illnesses every year across our hospital and community services. Sadly, there’s not a week that goes by when we don’t see a child with a respiratory condition on our wards. Reducing air pollution will help to improve the lives of children and young people across the city, reducing unnecessary visits to hospital and helping them to lead healthier lives.’

 

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