Researchers to develop model building to understand air pollution

Manufacturers will develop a miniature ‘Smart Cube’ building model to help scientists to understand how to tackle air pollution in cities across the world. 

According to researchers at the University of Surrey, it’s a challenge to understand how stagnant air within buildings can be replaced with fresh air from the outside as scientists need to be able to track pockets of air, however, there are too many pockets of air in a city neighbourhood for even the most powerful computer simulation.

The researchers say that the best and most practical way to study air pollution is therefore by using a wind tunnel, which are hollow tubes that have powerful fans to create a flow of air inside the tunnel.

The University of Surrey, alongside Surrey Sensors Ltd, has been awarded £140,000 from the Natural Environment Research Council to build a ‘smart’ generic building model that can be used in any wind tunnel

The team behind the project will allow other wind tunnels to use the model to verify their accuracy.

It’s hoped that the model could return valuable information for scientists, such as how air pollution spreads in a city, how building ventilation can be made more efficient and how indoor air quality can be improved, all without the need to insert any other measurement tools which may interfere with airflow.

Dr. David Burch, the project leader said: ‘People are finally acknowledging the fact that we are living through a climate crisis and we all have a duty to do everything we can to nurse our planet back to health.’

‘We believe our ‘Smart Cube’ has the potential to deliver the accuracy and resolution needed for scientists’ crucial efforts to understand and tackle air pollution in cities across the world.’

In related news, the ‘world’s largest’ outdoor air purifier, which turns smog particles into clean air, has opened at Pyeong-chon Central Park in Anyang, South Korea.

Photo Credit – Pixabay