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1/4 of UK addresses exceed air pollution limits

Air pollution exceeds World Health Organisation (WHO) limits at 25% of UK addresses, according to new data from addresspollution.org.

The new website uses data generated by experts at Imperial College London to provide users with a free Air Quality Report for every address in the UK. 

The website uses annualised data to reveal the levels of particulate matter (PM2.5) and nitrogen oxide (NO2) pollution at each address and then rates them accordingly. 

The data has revealed that nearly 8 million addresses in the UK have air pollution above the WHO limits, this equals 1/4 of all addresses in the country. 

The website also reveals the best and worst UK addresses for air pollution. Notably, the data highlighted that London’s famous Harley Street in Westminster, where homes are worth over £2.3m, 100% of the addresses have a ‘Very High’ rating.

In comparison, in East Riding, Yorkshire, every address has a ‘Low’ rating, yet homes cost under £150,000 on average.

Visitors to the address pollution website are urged to sign an online petition demanding that estate agents and property websites disclose air quality information to buyers and renters at the earliest opportunity.

Humphrey Milles, founder of the Central Office of Public Interest, the non-profit organisation that funded this project said: ‘Air pollution affects everyone. It is a dangerous, invisible killer.

‘With this national roll-out, it would be shameful for the property industry to not start acting in an honest, transparent way. Lives depend on it. Everyone has a right to know what they’re breathing.

‘Air pollution is now public information, and it will never not be again. So through the official court or the court of public opinion, change is coming.

‘The property industry will be forced to disclose air quality ratings and stop putting profits before people. And with the public finally able to see this invisible problem, the government will need to swiftly act to bring air pollution levels down.’

Photo Credit – Central Office of Public Interest

 

 

 

 

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Lofi Study
5 months ago

I hope they find a solution for this soon